Rural and Remote Health Journal photo
African section Asian section Australasian section European section Latin American section North American section
home
login/register
current articles

contribute
information for authors
status/user profile
links/forums
about us

Original Research

A rapid post-disaster surveillance model enabling outbreak detection and healthcare response following earthquakes on Kefalonia island, Greece, February–May 2014

Submitted: 13 October 2015
Revised: 22 October 2016
Accepted: 5 December 2016
Published: 7 March 2017

Full text: You can view the full article, or view a printable version.
Comments: (login to access the comments on this article)

Author(s) : Silvestros C, Mellou K, Williams C, Triantafyllou E, Rigakos G, Papoutsidou E, Tsekou K, Likiardopoulos S, Pantelios G, Kouris G, Christodoulakis G, Georgakopoulou T, Velonakis E, Hadjichristodoulou C, Tselentis Y.

Citation: Silvestros C, Mellou K, Williams C, Triantafyllou E, Rigakos G, Papoutsidou E, Tsekou K, Likiardopoulos S, Pantelios G, Kouris G, Christodoulakis G, Georgakopoulou T, Velonakis E, Hadjichristodoulou C, Tselentis Y.  A rapid post-disaster surveillance model enabling outbreak detection and healthcare response following earthquakes on Kefalonia island, Greece, February–May 2014. Rural and Remote Health (Internet) 2017; 17: 3744. Available: http://www.rrh.org.au/articles/subviewnew.asp?ArticleID=3744 (Accessed 25 June 2017). DOI: https://doi.org/10.22605/RRH3744

ABSTRACT

Introduction:  In early 2014, earthquakes struck the island of Kefalonia in Greece, causing damage to facilities and houses. An onsite investigation concluded that existing surveillance systems might not have been able to identify events of public health interest.
Methods:  A syndrome surveillance system was implemented and an additional system was designed for strengthening surveillance at the most affected area, Paliki. The first system was a daily reporting system of three clinical syndromes (fever, respiratory, gastrointestinal) including seven healthcare services of the island. The second system involved the local mayors in reporting any unusual health event in the villages of their jurisdiction. The two systems were in force from 7 February to 31 May 2014. This article describes the implementation of the two systems, presents their results, evaluates their performance and present the lessons learned from this experience.
Results:  The evaluation of the systems showed they performed well and fulfilled their objectives. One gastroenteritis outbreak was identified, enabling the timely implementation of control measures.
Conclusions:  Strengthening surveillance not only assured the timely identification of possible events of public health interest but also reassured the authorities and the population of the absence of a major event.

Key words: disease outbreak, earthquake, Greece, Kefalonia, natural disaster, public health surveillance, syndrome surveillance.

This abstract has been viewed 678 times since 7-Mar-2017.

   
 

   CONTACT US | COPYRIGHT AND DISCLAIMER | ADMIN ONLY